Is Tiger sending a message to Augusta National Golf Club?

I read recently on Tiger Woods golf site (www.tigerwoods.com) the following quote “The course was very difficult, I didn’t hear as many roars as I usually hear”. He wasn’t making excuses, he talked about why he didn’t win and wasn’t because of the course. But he also said “I hear the club might be making some changes next year to give us a break”. Is Tiger sending a message and will Augusta National respond?





If you watched this year’s Masters, you know what Tiger is talking about. Like in most majors, except the Masters until a couple of years ago, the golfers had to really work hard to break par, and many didn’t A few years ago, the members at Augusta National did some work and supposedly “Tiger Proofed” the course. And the scores have been higher since that work was done.
So was Tiger sending a subtle message or request to those rich golfers over in Augusta? I personally don’t believe so. I am sure that many would argue. But it seemed to me, and Tiger even said it, that it was his putter that kept him from winning another major in his relentless march towards destiny. And Tiger is not a whining golfer.
And I, for one hope that Augusta National remains the same challenging golf course for 2009 that it was for 2008. That is one of the things that I enjoy about watching the Majors. We amateur golfers get to see the pros struggle, at least to some degree, with the game of golf like we do. I just don’t enjoy those golf tournaments where the winning score is somewhere around 23 below par.
And there are those that say that one of the reasons that we are no longer dominating the Ryder Cup is the easy to score golf courses that many of the PGA tournaments are held on these days. And there may be some merit to that argument.
So my message would be, “Don’t change Augusta National. Make more golf courses on the pro tour tougher and let’s see what happens then.” I like the setups for the major tournaments and I’m not saying make the rest of the year’s golf tournaments that tough, but these golfers are pros, so let’s see em work for it a little more often.




There Are 3 Responses So Far. »

  1. If one watched the recent US Open, British Open & PGA dramatics [AND the recent Players events], they’d know that tough layouts and forcing the best to the test makes the majors special – hard to win with very little leeway for errors on the weekend. Hey, anyone can put on a Lost Weekend,
    North Dakota event where the cut is -4 and the winning score is -29. What tough courses & set-ups do is to force a player to play a good tournament and not be able to come from 6 back on the back nine per driver/short iron/putt luck or expertise. Augusta National now doesn’t have to rely on stimp 16 greens; it is no longer funhouse golf so the greens can be set to tour standards. If Pro-Vs, titanium drivers and putters anchored to body parts other than hands are allowed, then longer & narrower courses are needed for the pros.

  2. If one watched the recent US Open, British Open & PGA dramatics [AND the recent Players events], they’d know that tough layouts and forcing the best to the test makes the majors special – hard to win with very little leeway for errors on the weekend. Hey, anyone can put on a Lost Weekend,
    North Dakota event where the cut is -4 and the winning score is -29. What tough courses & set-ups do is to force a player to play a good tournament and not be able to come from 6 back on the back nine per driver/short iron/putt luck or expertise. Augusta National now doesn’t have to rely on stimp 16 greens; it is no longer funhouse golf so the greens can be set to tour standards. If Pro-Vs, titanium drivers and putters anchored to body parts other than hands are allowed, then longer & narrower courses are needed for the pros.

  3. I’ve just discovered you and your book. Looks inieresttng and I’m looking forward to reading it soon. I like your blog too, keep up the good work. About the demise of golf. I’ve only met a few people who won’t play golf because they say it’s too hard. In general I think that may just be an excuse to provide cover for how poorly they played. I believe the real reason is time and money. These days most people don’t have the time to go out for 4-5 hours on a Saturday or Sunday. It’s hard to justify spending that much time away from family, and weekend chores. Then if you can free up the time, cost is becoming outrageous. Clubs are much to expensive and green fees for a decent course can cost an arm and a leg. Then practice ranges are difficult to find and a large bucket of balls is 10 dollars. It’s expensive and time consuming to be even a casual golfer. Then if you wanted to make it a family affair; don’t know how the average person could afford it. Could it get worse? Yep. Now some public courses are being sold off to make budgets and then the average Joe losses access to an affordable golf experience.

Leave a Comment

*